Monthly Archives: August 2016

Hands-on review: Getac S410

Posted by on 31 August, 2016

This post was originally published on this site

If there was a fashion competition for laptops, the Getac S410 wouldn’t win it. And that’s fine, because this chunky system is a semi-rugged model designed to be used by field operatives based out in the great outdoors who need a device that’s reliable, solid and won’t weigh them down. Too much, anyway.

Getac S410

People who might use one include the police, professional services, vehicle operators and professionals who work in public safety and manufacturing. Where rugged tablets like the Panasonic CF-20 make more sense when portability is paramount and the device has to be held with one hand, the S410 offers a more traditional laptop experience with a full-sized keyboard and 14-inch display.

Getac S410

In terms of design, the S410 resembles a laptop you might have bought in 2002. To call it chunky would be something of an understatement, its thickness wading in at a substantial 1.4 inches (around 35mm). Still, that’s an improvement on the previous model, the Getac S400, which measured 1.93 inches (around 48mm) thick – so Getac is moving things in the right direction with this brand-new design.

Getac S410

All of that chunk lends the S410 a reassuringly solid feel in the hand. It’s near impossible to detect any flex in the device’s body, except for the keyboard part – and even then you have to press down really hard to get the plastic to bend. The solid chassis is what sets the S410 apart from regular laptops and quite literally forms the bulk of the laptop’s basic cost. It starts at £1,149 (around US$1,518 or AUS$1,990) and rises north of that sharply as the specs increase.

Getac S410

Compared to other rugged devices like the aforementioned Panasonic ToughBook CF-20. the Getac’s display is a let down. It’s 14-inches in size, but the pixel-resolution is a meager 1,366 x 768. Forgetting sharpness for a second, this provides a distinct lack of screen real-estate and pinning two apps side-by-side is a compromised experience. There’s no issue with using one app at a time in full-screen, but multi-tasking is frustrating at best.

Getac S410

The display is also difficult to see outdoors due to lackluster brightness. The S410 can be configured with Getac’s 1000-nits Lumibond display with sunlight readable technology, but we can only assume that it was missing on our review sample as it barely looked like it was reaching 400 nits to our eyes. Colours appear washed out and lifeless, and viewing angles are poor due to the TFT panel used.

The S410’s keyboard posses no challenges to typing, with decent sized keys – even if they’re not particularly satisfying to type on and sound cheap under the fingers. Getac has done a better job with the trackpad and its accompanying buttons, which despite being small are responsive. Unfortunately there’s no touch operation here, so forget using a digitizer or your fingers.

Getac S410

You can, of course, hook up a mouse to the machine into one of the ports. Connectivity options include four USB ports, Wi-Fi (802.11c), audio, VGA, HDMI and an SD-Slot.

Getac has outfitted the S410 with Intel’s ultra-low voltage Core i5-6200U processor clocked at 2.3GHz (Turbo Boost to 2.4GHz), backed up by an insubstantial 4GB of main memory. There was no dedicated graphics option to speak of in our review sample, with the processor’s integrated HD Graphics 520 taking on graphics duties alone.

Getac S410

Benchmarks

  • Cinebench R15: OpenGL: 28.38 fps; CPU: 284 points
  • Geekbench (Single-Core): 2,691 points; (Multi-Core) 5,732 points
  • Battery test (1080p looped video streamed over Wi-Fi in Edge, 50% brightness): 5 hours 24 minutes

The S410 produced fairly low benchmark results, and while the system was nippy enough most of the time with apps loading instantly, it did produce occasional moments of lag when performing tasks such as opening the Settings or Action Center panel. You won’t have any problem running legacy apps on this machine, but the S410 would struggle under more CPU-intensive scenarios.

Getac S410

Even battery life isn’t particularly up to scratch, despite the low-resolution display, with the S410 reaching a barely acceptable 5 hours and 24 minutes away from the plug socket. That’s fine for, say, an Asus UX305 ultrabook, but the Getac is designed to be used away from a plug socket for hours on end.

Also, the test was conducted with the screen’s brightness set to 50%, which rendered it nearly impossible to see outdoors in bright sunlight. Even though you would eke out a few more hours of battery, it would be at the expense of actually being able to do any work on the display.

Early verdict

It feels like the entry-level version of the Getac S410 has potential, but the unit we received to test was way too compromised to recommend. Its design, although chunky, is a clear improvement on the S400 and houses a comfortable keyboard, practical carry handle and a healthy selection of ports. However, the machine’s display, average-strength processor and low amount of main memory render it unsuitable for working out in the field. When that’s the primary objective of the device, that’s not particularly heartening.

Posted Under: Tech Reviews
Salesforce shares face plant despite beating analyst expectations

Posted by on 31 August, 2016

This post was originally published on this site

Salesforce earnings came out today! They’re not great, either, and it looks like a weak outlook for the company’s third quarter is doing some damage to its shares, which were down as much as 8 percent.

For a company that literally defined the phrase “software as a service” — basically, running your business online — and one that’s had a decent year (shares are about flat), today’s numbers apparently don’t look very good for Wall Street. Salesforce has been aggressively spending on acquisitions, buying Demandware for $2.8 billion and Quip for $750 million earlier this year. Whether this will keep shareholders happy is predicated on that strategy being a healthy one to add to Salesforce’s growth, and while these acquisitions only recently happened, it looks like Wall Street may be having some doubts about Salesforce’s future.

Here’s the quick scorecard:

  • Revenue of $2.04 billion, an increase of 25 percent year-over-year (beat — analysts were looking for $2.02 billion in revenue)
  • Earnings of 24 cents per share (beat — analysts were looking for 22 cents per share)
  • Guidance of $2.11 billion to $2.12 billion for Q3 (miss — analysts were looking for $2.13 billion)
  • Shares are down more than 8 percent in extended trading

That share drop might not seem like a large number, but for a company worth tens of billions of dollars, a 5 percent slide can easily mean erasing more than $2 billion in value from the company. If it’s going to continue making aggressive acquisitions, it has to keep that share price healthy in order to make the pitch that the companies are getting their money’s worth when they make their sales. For any company that’s recently been bought by Salesforce — and there have been a lot — with shares as part of the deal, employees are watching their value drop in real time.

It looks like that last part about missing slightly on guidance was not a happy data point with investors. This is still the first time the company has brought in $2 billion in revenue in a single quarter, but it’s not enough to keep its run going after aggressively spending on new businesses and talent. Shares of Salesforce are up more than 30 percent in the past two years, but for 2017 they’ve been mostly flat.

And, there’s also this:

With Salesforce under attack from literally all sides, it’s had to get creative — and that means pulling out the checkbook. Ultimately beaten by Microsoft with a $26.2 billion price tag, Salesforce made aggressive bids for LinkedIn, which would give itself probably one of the largest customer acquisition channels on the planet. It also shelled out $750 million for Quip, an online collaboration tool, that increasingly brings it into competition with online collaboration tools companies. (Oh, hey: Box also reported earnings today, and they’re not great!).

Salesforce’s core business is increasingly finding itself in competition with other companies that are choosing to specialize in one area of its core business (like Zendesk in its customer service tools), where those companies try to aggressively outperform Salesforce’s all-in-one tools. So it has to invent new ways to continue driving its revenue growth in order to keep investors happy, and that means inventing new businesses or — in the past year in Salesforce’s case — spending billions of dollars on potential new businesses.

Update: The share price is continuing to fall, now down more than 8 percent in extended trading.

Posted Under: Tech News
Glint raises $27 million to stop solid employees from bailing

Posted by on 31 August, 2016

This post was originally published on this site

Redwood City-based Glint has raised $27 million in a Series C round of venture funding for software that helps companies figure out how their teams are experiencing problems, or why and when solid employees may leave, undesirably.

Glint replaces the traditional 360-review tools used by corporate HR teams and executives with short, anonymous surveys sent out once in a while to specific groups or company-wide to gather feedback.

Then, Glint’s software-as-a-service uses machine learning, natural language processing and predictive analytics to identify key areas for improvement.

Understanding what employees want more or less of, and how employees are feeling about management, perks or benefits, their industry and more helps businesses avoid internal problems and attrition.

Meritech Capital Partners and Bessemer Venture Partners co-led the round joined by returning investors Norwest Venture Partners, and Shasta Ventures, and bringing Glint’s total equity funding raised to $50 million.

Glint CEO and co-founder Jim Barnett explained that Glint protects confidentiality, in part, by only allowing employers to slice and dice data down to a group of 5 or more people, and only giving certain people permission to read employees’ comments.

“Only the right people see the right survey data, and employees can choose to fill those out or not. We do get get average response rates of 85% though,” he said.

Glint Inc. CEO and cofounder Jim Barnett.

Glint CEO and cofounder Jim Barnett.

Companies can customize surveys to be longer or shorter, more or less frequently issued.

Clients of Glint include Verizon-owned AOL (the parent company of TechCrunch), E-bay, Cognizant and Sky Broadcasting, among others.

Medium to large enterprises are drawn to Glint’s software and analytics platform, the CEO said, because it helps them avoid attrition and performance issues, and allows them to take all employees’ comments into consideration efficiently, unlike a traditional process that involved manual reviews and reading of suggestions or complaints.

The platform supports companies in 30 different languages, so far.

Glint also helps companies understand how employees’ satisfaction with their work and their employers may be effecting their business. For example, a health care company may find that patient outcomes are highly correlated with happy employees, or employees who feel happy with the flexibility of their schedules, he said.

Bessemer Ventures’ Kristina Shen said she believes Glint has the potential to get to an initial public offering, eventually. But the HR-tech market is one of many mergers and acquisitions, historically.

She believes that Glint’s technology is tapping into major trends reshaping the workplace, namely that millennial workers want to be heard, and that employers have woken up to the fact that losing good employees is very costly.

Shen said, “For every employee you lose, you spend a lot of money on recruiting, hiring and onboarding . It just feels better and costs you less to figure out what employees really want, then bring it to them, versus losing a good employee.”

Glint intends to use its funding for hiring, product development and to move into new market segments, after early customer traction in Silicon Valley and with tech companies.

Posted Under: Tech News
Hands-on review: IFA 2016: Lenovo Yoga Book

Posted by on 31 August, 2016

This post was originally published on this site

If Apple, Microsoft and their lot are the Thomas Edisons of the computing industry, then Lenovo has become the Nikola Tesla. Whereas the de facto founders of Silicon Valley established (and consistently update) the status quo for computing, Lenovo has constantly questioned and toyed with just what computing is since it bought IBM’s ThinkPad business.

Lenovo’s latest wild experiment? The company that pioneered the convertible hybrid laptop design has taken that concept to what might be its logical conclusion: the Yoga Book.

Why make such strong allusions? Because, like so many of Tesla’s works, the Yoga Book really could either be the cool, ingenious, tablet-driven future of laptops that just makes sense. Or, it could be a flop to be forever remembered by diehard fans and hipsters.

Yoga Book

Keyboard, begone!

This is because the Yoga Book, a 10.1-inch laptop-tablet hybrid that comes with either Android Marshmallow or Windows 10, has no keyboard. Rather, its “bottom” half, attached via a variation on Lenovo’s signature 360-degree watchband hinge, is a capacitive touch surface.

This magnesium-aluminum alloy surface (found across the tablet), called a Create Pad by Lenovo, can conjure a touch-based keyboard for you instantly. The Create Pad also features haptic feedback – and, living up to its name, can double as a veritable Wacom digitizer replacement with Lenovo’s Real Pen stylus.

Just sit on that for a moment. A computing device that can operate as a laptop, a full blown tablet and a digital art tool without so much as a button press between them. It sounds like one of those too-good-to-be-true scenarios, doesn’t it?

Yoga Book

Having played with the Yoga Book for a few minutes during a briefing recently, we can say that is not necessarily the case here. We’ll be upfront in saying that typing on a Yoga Book involves a rather steep learning curve.

We’re all used to typing on screens because they’re in the front of our faces – we can always see in plain sight where our fingers are. That’s not the case with a laptop. In fact, some might say the mark of a skilled typist is that she doesn’t have to look at the keyboard at all.

Upon first trying to type on the Yoga Book, your eyes will probably struggle to stop from involuntarily looking at the keyboard. The haptic feedback helps fill in for the physical touch and force of plastic keys, but we’re hesitant to say whether it’s a worthy replacement.

Yoga Book

At the very least, it is incredibly close.

Typing on the device admittedly feels a bit strange and discouraging for someone that prides himself on his typing accuracy. But, coupled with practice and some awfully strong auto-correction software, you might not be missing your laptop before long. (I certainly wasn’t.)

However, with this comes a conundrum facing the Yoga Book: at least from when we last tried out the device, it’s clear that either Lenovo or Microsoft has to work on the Yoga Book with Windows 10’s auto-correction software. Frankly, it’s far less advanced than Google’s.

Yoga Book

We had noticeably more trouble typing out sentences on the Windows 10 model than the Android one during our time with both, which is a shame considering Microsoft’s superior position in pen recognition and general productivity. Hopefully, these discrepancies will be fully resolved before the devices’ launch this October.

Death (or rebirth) to the pen

The typing experience only covers one half of the Yoga Book’s incredibly unique selling proposition. The device can double as a drawing tool with the included Real Pen. The palm rejection is on point, as is the pressure sensitivity – all 2,048 levels of it.

But, what if you like good old pen and paper? Lenovo’s thought of that, too. Using the firm’s Book Pad, really just a yellow note pad with a magnetic strip to hold on with, you can instantly back up your handwritten, analog notes into digital representations.

Yoga Book

This is accomplished through what is known as electromagnetic response (EMR) technology. Basically, the pen – which can swap between real ink and plastic tips – generates electromagnetic electricity that the tablet’s Create Pad picks up and translates into legible characters, words and sentences.

The technology in action was a bit mind blowing to see for the first time, to be honest. Being able to interact with a single device in this many ways, and effectively, is nothing short of amazing.

The best of the rest

Lenovo powers this futuristic experience with a quad-core Intel Atom x-series processor, 4GB of DDR3 RAM and 64GB of flash storage – all behind an FHD (1,920 x 1,200) IPS display. And, that’s on both Windows 10 and Android.

Yoga Book

An 8,500 mAh battery said to last up to 15 hours of general usage keeps the 0.38-inch-thin (9.6mm), 1.52-pound (690g) slate running. (Of course, we couldn’t test this during a hands on review.)

The Windows 10 version of the Yoga Book comes solely in all Carbon Black, while the Android version offers Gunmetal Gray and Champagne Gold.

Early verdict

Honestly, this thing could come in purple and this editor would still buy in. (Actually, that would look pretty cool.) That’s partly because, for the tablet, a Real Pen, ink cartridge refills and screen tips, and the Book Pad, Lenovo wants just $499 (about £391, AU$664) for the Android version and $549 (about £419, AU$731) for the Windows variety to start.

Yoga Book

Sure, this is a low-powered device no doubt, but nothing that you couldn’t complete basic productivity tasks with, like what some of us at TechRadar use a Surface Pro 4 every day for.

Ultimately, to focus on things like specs and power is to completely miss the point of the Yoga Book. The point is to show us a different way of computing that has been a long time coming, the first truly exciting and genuinely interesting attempt to push the laptop into the next phase of its storied life.

And, it actually works.

Posted Under: Tech Reviews
Hands-on review: IFA 2016: Lenovo Yoga Book

Posted by on 31 August, 2016

This post was originally published on this site

If Apple, Microsoft and their lot are the Thomas Edisons of the computing industry, then Lenovo has become the Nikola Tesla. Whereas the de facto founders of Silicon Valley established (and consistently update) the status quo for computing, Lenovo has constantly questioned and toyed with just what computing is since it bought IBM’s ThinkPad business.

Lenovo’s latest wild experiment? The company that pioneered the convertible hybrid laptop design has taken that concept to what might be its logical conclusion: the Yoga Book.

Why make such strong allusions? Because, like so many of Tesla’s works, the Yoga Book really could either be the cool, ingenious, tablet-driven future of laptops that just makes sense. Or, it could be a flop to be forever remembered by diehard fans and hipsters.

Yoga Book

Keyboard, begone!

This is because the Yoga Book, a 10.1-inch laptop-tablet hybrid that comes with either Android Marshmallow or Windows 10, has no keyboard. Rather, its “bottom” half, attached via a variation on Lenovo’s signature 360-degree watchband hinge, is a capacitive touch surface.

This magnesium-aluminum alloy surface (found across the tablet), called a Create Pad by Lenovo, can conjure a touch-based keyboard for you instantly. The Create Pad also features haptic feedback – and, living up to its name, can double as a veritable Wacom digitizer replacement with Lenovo’s Real Pen stylus.

Just sit on that for a moment. A computing device that can operate as a laptop, a full blown tablet and a digital art tool without so much as a button press between them. It sounds like one of those too-good-to-be-true scenarios, doesn’t it?

Yoga Book

Having played with the Yoga Book for a few minutes during a briefing recently, we can say that is not necessarily the case here. We’ll be upfront in saying that typing on a Yoga Book involves a rather steep learning curve.

We’re all used to typing on screens because they’re in the front of our faces – we can always see in plain sight where our fingers are. That’s not the case with a laptop. In fact, some might say the mark of a skilled typist is that she doesn’t have to look at the keyboard at all.

Upon first trying to type on the Yoga Book, your eyes will probably struggle to stop from involuntarily looking at the keyboard. The haptic feedback helps fill in for the physical touch and force of plastic keys, but we’re hesitant to say whether it’s a worthy replacement.

Yoga Book

At the very least, it is incredibly close.

Typing on the device admittedly feels a bit strange and discouraging for someone that prides himself on his typing accuracy. But, coupled with practice and some awfully strong auto-correction software, you might not be missing your laptop before long. (I certainly wasn’t.)

However, with this comes a conundrum facing the Yoga Book: at least from when we last tried out the device, it’s clear that either Lenovo or Microsoft has to work on the Yoga Book with Windows 10’s auto-correction software. Frankly, it’s far less advanced than Google’s.

Yoga Book

We had noticeably more trouble typing out sentences on the Windows 10 model than the Android one during our time with both, which is a shame considering Microsoft’s superior position in pen recognition and general productivity. Hopefully, these discrepancies will be fully resolved before the devices’ launch this October.

Death (or rebirth) to the pen

The typing experience only covers one half of the Yoga Book’s incredibly unique selling proposition. The device can double as a drawing tool with the included Real Pen. The palm rejection is on point, as is the pressure sensitivity – all 2,048 levels of it.

But, what if you like good old pen and paper? Lenovo’s thought of that, too. Using the firm’s Book Pad, really just a yellow note pad with a magnetic strip to hold on with, you can instantly back up your handwritten, analog notes into digital representations.

Yoga Book

This is accomplished through what is known as electromagnetic response (EMR) technology. Basically, the pen – which can swap between real ink and plastic tips – generates electromagnetic electricity that the tablet’s Create Pad picks up and translates into legible characters, words and sentences.

The technology in action was a bit mind blowing to see for the first time, to be honest. Being able to interact with a single device in this many ways, and effectively, is nothing short of amazing.

The best of the rest

Lenovo powers this futuristic experience with a quad-core Intel Atom x-series processor, 4GB of DDR3 RAM and 64GB of flash storage – all behind an FHD (1,920 x 1,200) IPS display. And, that’s on both Windows 10 and Android.

Yoga Book

An 8,500 mAh battery said to last up to 15 hours of general usage keeps the 0.38-inch-thin (9.6mm), 1.52-pound (690g) slate running. (Of course, we couldn’t test this during a hands on review.)

The Windows 10 version of the Yoga Book comes solely in all Carbon Black, while the Android version offers Gunmetal Gray and Champagne Gold.

Early verdict

Honestly, this thing could come in purple and this editor would still buy in. (Actually, that would look pretty cool.) That’s partly because, for the tablet, a Real Pen, ink cartridge refills and screen tips, and the Book Pad, Lenovo wants just $499 (about £391, AU$664) for the Android version and $549 (about £419, AU$731) for the Windows variety to start.

Yoga Book

Sure, this is a low-powered device no doubt, but nothing that you couldn’t complete basic productivity tasks with, like what some of us at TechRadar use a Surface Pro 4 every day for.

Ultimately, to focus on things like specs and power is to completely miss the point of the Yoga Book. The point is to show us a different way of computing that has been a long time coming, the first truly exciting and genuinely interesting attempt to push the laptop into the next phase of its storied life.

And, it actually works.

Posted Under: Tech Reviews
Hands-on review: IFA 2016: Lenovo Yoga 910

Posted by on 31 August, 2016

This post was originally published on this site

After sticking with the same design for two years, Lenovo is giving the Yoga 900 a dramatic makeover and it’s fair to say the Yoga 910 is completely different 2-in-1 laptop. Lenovo has tweaked or completely changed every element of its flagship convertible with everything including a slimmer chassis, larger 13.9-inch UHD screen, smaller bezels, revamped keyboard layout and the Intel 7th generation processors.

However, all these little improvements have made the Lenovo Yoga 910 a slightly more expensive device starting at $1,299. But even with the higher price tag, this still feels like the best hybrid machine on the market.

Lenovo Yoga 910 review

Design

Lenovo claims the Yoga 910 the world’s thinnest Intel Core i7 powered convertible measuring in at just 14.3mm thick (0.56 inches) – 0.6mm (0.02 inches) thinner than the Yoga 900. Along with dropping some extra bulk, this new hybrid has a new sleeker and sharper styling rather than the slightly curvy frame of yesteryear.

The Lenovo Yoga 910 follows a starkly modern design with straight lines forming sharp angles including places you wouldn’t expect such embellishment. For example, the top and bottom half of the notebook meet to a slightly indented V-shape and an even more prominent gap near the watchband hinge.

Lenovo Yoga 910 review

The modern touches are a welcome change after seeing practically the same design for the last two years, but at the same time it feels like Lenovo went too far in certain respects. The leatherette interior was one of the most comfortable aspects of the Yoga 900 and now it has been replaced with cold aluminum sheet.

Thanks to the slimmer design, you also lose Lenovo’s full-sized USB-A charging port in exchange for the new USB-C standard. That said, there are plenty of new elements to enjoy here including the a newly added fingerprint reader and one of the most impressive screens ever seen on a 13-inch.

Lenovo Yoga 910 review

Larger screen with none of the bulk

The Dell XPS 13 and XPS 15 blew us away by packing full-size screen into smaller chassis, and now Lenovo is trying to capture the same magic with the Yoga 910.

The display panel size has been bumped up to 13.9-inches and a new 4K resolution without drastically increasing the size of the chassis. In fact, this laptop features some of the thinnest bezels we’ve ever seen on a Lenovo device.

This is thanks to slimming down the bezels along the top and sides while moving the webcam to the sizable chin beneath the screen. It effectively uses the same Infinity Screen layout first introduced by Dell and the only real discernable differences is Lenovo has placed the webcam in the center of the screen rather than off to the left.

Lenovo Yoga 910 review

That said, the Yoga 910 uses its clever convertible abilities to avoid displaying a worm’s-eye view during video calls. Users can simply switch the laptop into tent mode and have it sit on its front edges to have a video camera that meets them at eye-level.

One downside to this new design is the bottom bezel is nearly two inches tall and largely featureless. Thanks to the webcam’s positioning, Lenovo had to leave out a Windows button soft key, which would have added some much needed some flair to hybrid’s extra-large chin.

Lenovo Yoga 910 review

Everything is new

Lenovo introduced plenty of other little tweaks here and there to make the Yoga 910 an even better laptop-tablet.

The keyboard, for example, no longer has any of those annoying right-handed shortcut keys to get in the way of you hitting the enter key. Meanwhile, the trackpad is appreciably larger and there’s even a newly added fingerprint reader to help get you signed through Windows Hello with a simple finger press.

The Lenovo Yoga 910 features some bumped up specs including Intel’s freshly announced Intel 7th generation processors with up to 1TB of PCIe SSD storage and 16GB of memory. Battery life has also seen a significant bump to 10.5 hours on UHD model and 15.5 hours with Full HD variants – but those are only estimates we plan to take to task.

Lenovo Yoga 910 review

Early verdict

The Lenovo Yoga 900 perfected the 2-in-1 laptop formula and now the Yoga 910 seeks to elevate the series to all new heights. There are plenty of welcome elements here including the larger screen, edgier design and revamped inputs. However, some of the changes aren’t sitting well with us including the marginally higher price and the new bare metal keyboard deck.

In the past the Yoga 900 series has blended a good mix of affordability with performance, but this latest iteration may skew things too far into the luxury category. We’ll have to see how the other configurations stack up as well as how this machine performs before we can deliver our final verdict, but we’re optimistic that Lenovo has knocked it out of the park once again.

Posted Under: Tech Reviews
Facebook open sources Zstandard compression algorithm and MyRocks storage engine

Posted by on 31 August, 2016

This post was originally published on this site

Today, Facebook is releasing its Zstandard compression algorithm into the wild as open source. The lossless compression technology is aimed at replacing existing libraries like Zlib that are powered by the outdated Deflate compression algorithm. In addition to Zstandard, Facebook is also dropping its MyRocks storage engine as open source. MyRocks is currently being used by Facebook to improve the storage efficiency of its MySQL databases.

Both releases occurred in coordination with Facebook’s @Scale conference in San Jose. The conference supports engineers working to solve large scale engineering challenges by bringing them together, side-by-side, with other companies in the industry dedicated to increasing the prevalence of open source technology. Both Zstandard and MyRocks will enable developers to build platforms that can efficiently scale to large and diverse user bases.

One of the greatest fears of engineers looking to update and replace critical infrastructure is that the new libraries could bring an entire service down. Jay Parikh, vice president of infrastructure engineering at Facebook, is proud of the fact that both Zstandard and MyRocks were tested at scale across the company before being released to the community.

“Everyone here uses all of the products,” added Parikh.

In the six months that Facebook has been testing Zstandard, the company noted impressive results. With the same compression ratio of ZLib, Zstandard was five times faster. In a case where the compression time was held constant, files were 10 percent smaller.

MyRocks has also produced some serious storage efficiencies. When compared to compressed InnoDB, MyRocks was able to store the same amount of data on half the server space.

“Making it open source makes the community better,” added Parikh. “It will be adopted more quickly as open source than had if was created as the proprietary technology of a single company.”

Facebook hopes that their open source solutions can become new industry standards.

Featured Image: erhui1979/Getty Images

Posted Under: Tech News
Cisco WS-X6416-GBIC 16-Port Gigabit Ethernet Line Card

Posted by on 31 August, 2016

This post was originally published on this site

Cisco WS-X6416-GBIC 16-Port Gigabit Ethernet Line Card

Overview:

The Cisco Catalyst® 6000 Family, which includes the Catalyst 6000 and 6500 Series, delivers new high-performance, feature-rich, multilayer switching solutions for enterprise and service provider networks. Designed to address the increased requirements for gigabit scalability, high availability, and multilayer switching in campus backbone and distribution points, Internet data centers, and Web hosting and e-commerce environments.

Specifications:

  • Brand: Cisco
  • Model: WS-X6416-GBIC
  • Device Type: Expansion module – 16 ports
  • Number of ethernet ports: 16 Ethernet Ports
  • Designed For: Cisco Catalyst 6503, 6506, 6509, 6509-NEB, 6513
  • No SFP
Posted Under: General
Polycom ViewStation PVS-1419-Q NTSC Camera ISDN S/T Interface

Posted by on 31 August, 2016

This post was originally published on this site

Polycom ViewStation PVS-1419-Q NTSC Camera ISDN S/T Interface

Overview

The Polycom ViewStation PVS-1419-Q makes video conference calls alongside of viewing presentations on multiple screens. Systems can operate an Ethernet LAN cable internet connection.

Specifications

  • Includes camera unit only
  • Supports Ethernet Network Connection
  • Provides Remote Video Conferencing

This item has not been tested. Any configurations and passwords may need to cleared before use. There may be minor scratches, nominal discoloration and some scuff marks.
No power adapter is available. No other accessories are included.

Posted Under: General
Amx NI-3100 NetLinx Integrated Controller (FG2105-05)

Posted by on 31 August, 2016

This post was originally published on this site

Amx NI-3100 NetLinx Integrated Controller (FG2105-05)

Overview

With the ability to integrate a large number of devices, the NI-3100 controls a wide variety of components including audio/video conferencing, projectors, DVD and Blu-Ray players, lights, thermostats and other electronic equipment found in larger areas. With these technology-driven environments, the NI-3100 also provides solutions for future expansion and enables the addition of more devices and control capabilities. Offers higher performance with an ultra-fast processor, 64MB of onboard RAM and is AMX Device Discovery enabled.

Specifications:

  • 7 Configurable RS-232 / RS-422 / RS-485 Serial ports
  • 8 Relays
  • 8 IR / Serial ports
  • 8 Digital I/O ports
  • 2 Communication Networks: AxLink and Ethernet (TCP/IP)
  • 404 MIPS processor speed
  • No accessories included.
Posted Under: General
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