Category Archives: Database

Light a fire under Cassandra with Apache Ignite

Posted by on 27 April, 2017

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Apache Cassandra is a popular database for several reasons. The open source, distributed, NoSQL database has no single point of failure, so it’s well suited for high-availability applications. It supports multi-datacenter replication, allowing organizations to achieve greater resiliency by, for example, storing data across multiple Amazon Web Services availability zones. It also offers massive and linear scalability, so any number of nodes can easily be added to any Cassandra cluster in any datacenter. For these reasons, companies such as Netflix, eBay, Expedia, and several others have been using Cassandra for key parts of their businesses for many years.

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SQL-powered MapD 3.0 woos enterprise developers

Posted by on 26 April, 2017

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MapD, the SQL database and analytics platform that uses GPU acceleration for performance orders of magnitude ahead of CPU-based solutions, has been updated to version 3.0.

The update provides a mix of high-end and mundane additions. The high-end goodies consist of deep architectural changes that enable even greater performance gains in clustered environments. But the mundane items are no less important, as they’re aimed at making life easier for enterprise database developers—those most likely to use MapD.

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R and Python drive SQL Server 2017 into machine learning

Posted by on 26 April, 2017

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Microsoft last week announced a wave of new features for its data platform, along with the SQL Server 2017 name and what Microsoft calls a “production quality” beta release. Other important changes include a new containerized deployment model for databases, which simplifies installation on Windows and Linux.

But it was SQL Server’s new machine learning tools that grabbed my attention.

Machine learning remains one of Microsoft’s big themes for 2017, and it’s an important segment of SQL Server 2017. Mixing code and data has always been part of SQL Server, first with T-SQL, then with the Azure-focused U-SQL, which extended T-SQL with C# elements. SQL Server 2016 added support for embedded R code, and SQL Server 2017 continues that evolution by improving its support for R and adding Python. (By renaming SQL Server 2016’s R Services to Machine Learning Services in SQL Server 2017, Microsoft has made clear where it’s aiming its SQL tools.)

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Python power comes to SQL Server 2017

Posted by on 20 April, 2017

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Don’t bring the data to your computation if you can help it. Bring your computation to your data.

Microsoft has heeded this cardinal rule of information science with the latest Community Technology Preview release of SQL Server 2017. Python can now be used within SQL Server to perform analytics, run machine learning models, or handle most any kind of data-powered work.

This integration isn’t limited to enterprise editions of SQL Server 2017, either—it’ll also be available in the free-to-use Express edition.

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NoSQL grudge match: MongoDB vs. Couchbase Server

Posted by on 20 April, 2017

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Choosing the right database for the job can be a daunting task, particularly if you’re entertaining the full space of SQL and NoSQL options. If you’re looking for a flexible, general-purpose option that allows for fluid schemas and complex nested data structures, a document database might be right for you. MongoDB and Couchbase Server are two popular choices. How should you choose?

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(Insider Story)

Oracle fixes Struts and Shadow Brokers exploits in huge patch release

Posted by on 19 April, 2017

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Oracle has released a record 299 security fixes for vulnerabilities in its products, including patches for a widely exploited vulnerability in the Apache Struts framework and a Solaris exploit supposedly used by the U.S. National Security Agency.

The Struts vulnerability allows for remote code execution on Java web servers and was patched on March 6. Attackers have quickly adopted it and have used it in widespread attacks since then.

Oracle uses Apache Struts 2 in several of its products, which is why Tuesday’s critical patch update (CPU) fixed 25 instances of the vulnerability in Oracle Communications, Retail and Financial Services applications, as well as in the MySQL Enterprise Monitor, Oracle WebCenter Sites, Oracle WebLogic Server and the Siebel E-Billing app.

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PostgreSQL 10.0 appeals to the SQL faithful

Posted by on 10 April, 2017

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The next major release of the PostgreSQL open source database system, version 10, aims to satisfy the SQL faithful.

Over the last few years, conventional databases have rolled in more features inspired by or borrowed outright from NoSQL. PostgreSQL added such features in previous versions, but version 10 contains several major SQL-centric changes that lay the foundation for other, long-desired improvements.

Little changes, big steps

A blog post by Robert Haas, vice president and chief architect at EnterpriseDB, a commercial support and services company for PostgreSQL, itemizes the big changes. Standouts from that list include the following:

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Review: MongoDB learns cool new tricks

Posted by on 15 March, 2017

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MongoDB 3.4 continues the trend of databases building out support for a range of conceptual data models over the same underlying data store. This multimodel approach aims to deliver a single database that can be used to store data as documents, tables, and graphs simultaneously. The benefit to the user is a dramatically simplified infrastructure when compared to a polyglot persistence model, which might entail managing three or four separate data stores to satisfy those different use cases.

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(Insider Story)

MongoDB adds free tier and migration utility to cloud service

Posted by on 7 March, 2017

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NoSQL database specialist MongoDB unveiled a new free tier for its MongoDB Atlas database-as-a-service (DaaS) offering on Tuesday. The company also released a utility to support live migration of data to MongoDB Atlas, whether that data is on-premise or in the cloud.

“Since we first introduced MongoDB to the community in 2009, we have been laser-focused on one thing—building a technology that gets out of the way of developers and makes them more productive,” Eliot Horowitz, CTO and co-founder of MongoDB, said in a statement Tuesday. “Now, with these updates to MongoDB Atlas, we’re tearing down more of the barriers that stand between developers and their giant ideas.”

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