Genuine HP Q3984A 110V Image Fuser Kit for HP Color LaserJet 5550 Series

Posted by on 26 May, 2016

This post was originally published on this site
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Details about  Genuine HP Q3984A 110V Image Fuser Kit for HP Color LaserJet 5550 Series

US $114.99

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Posted Under: eBay Store
Meet the latest cohort of Acceleprise startups, and the apps they built to make work easier

Posted by on 25 May, 2016

This post was originally published on this site

Acceleprise, a San Francisco-based accelerator for enterprise tech and software-as-a-service startups, held a Demo Day for its third cohort of companies today.

The accelerator invests $50,000 into each startup admitted to its program via convertible note financing, taking approximately a 5 percent stake under a $1 million cap.

It admits 8-12 companies per cohort, and invests out of a $3.5 million pre-seed fund anchored by Employ Insight CEO Sean Glass.

During its program, Acceleprise helps startups hone their apps and business models, strike relationships with early pilot or paying customers and officially launch a product.

After they leave the nest, partners at Acceleprise work in an advisory capacity with startups in their portfolio to help them become seed- or even Series A-ready.

Acceleprise Managing Director Michael Cardamone said that the fundraising environment has become more challenging for SaaS businesses of late.

Venture investors with institutional firms that do early-stage deals now want to see software-as-a-service startups making $1.5 million in annual recurring revenue with significant traction in their respective markets before they will sign a term sheet, Cardamone said.

That’s a higher bar than business-to-business software startups faced just three years ago.

Cardamone said selling into enterprises has become more competitive, as well.

“The people who set tech policies and make purchasing decisions within large or fast-growing companies, and that’s usually a Chief Information Officer, are using tens of different apps, and many I’ve met will be using over 100 different apps to keep their businesses running,” Cardamone said.

That means SaaS companies can’t offer something that’s only a slightly better tool than what’s out there and expect to win customers over, even for a limited trial run.

Back in the day when juggernauts of enterprise tech were ramping up, like Salesforce or Amazon Web Services, the market wasn’t nearly as cluttered.

Companies in Acceleprise’s latest batch were equally split between those focused on a particular industry, from agriculture (Skycision) to mobile telecoms (MobilePhire), and those offering “horizontal” solutions that could help businesses in any industry manage travel and expenses (TripCloud) or deliver customer service via popular messaging platforms from SMS to Facebook Messenger or Slack (Lifecycle.io).

A new trend among applicants, Cardamone noticed, was the implementation of advanced machine learning, analytics and chat bots to solve the needs of workers or their employers.

A full list of the 8 companies in the most recent cohort at Acceleprise follows below, with links and descriptions supplied by the accelerator.

Baloonr: Anonymously surface and prioritize information for any group.

CareerLark: Next generation performance management and employee feedback platform.

ContextSmith: Turns distributed emails with customers into actionable data.

Glowfish.io: Industrial IoT enhanced asset monitoring and early warning as a service.

Lifecycle.io: The simplest way for businesses to create intelligent conversations over mobile messaging channels.

MobilePhire: Analytics and control for corporate mobile data usage.

Skycision: Image-based crop management software for the global agriculture industry.

TripCloud: Free travel management solution for small- to medium-sized businesses.

Featured Image: Acceleprise (IMAGE HAS BEEN MODIFIED)

Posted Under: Tech News
Salesforce inks deal with AWS to expand international presence

Posted by on 25 May, 2016

This post was originally published on this site

AWS announced today that it was expanding its relationship with Salesforce.com, with Salesforce naming the cloud giant a preferred cloud provider.

The agreement should help Salesforce increase its international presence without having to build its own data centers in countries that have data sovereignty laws, which require that data stays in-country. It’s expensive to build their own, so they are turning to a public cloud infrastructure provider like Amazon to do the heavy lifting for them.

Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff spoke glowingly of AWS. “There is no public cloud infrastructure provider that is more sophisticated or has more robust enterprise capabilities for supporting the needs of our growing global customer base,” he said in a statement.

It’s worth keeping in mind, however that Salesforce also has a deep relationship with Microsoft — and CEO Satya Nadella appeared on stage at Dreamforce, Salesforce’s massive customer conference last fall.

But the relationship has a flip side and the companies also compete with one another. R Ray Wang, who is principal at Constellation Research, points out that this announcement should help Salesforce compete with Oracle and Microsoft overseas.

It also helps Salesforce keep its options open so it doesn’t rely too much on any single vendor, especially Microsoft, while building on its existing relationship with AWS.

“The experiences in the IOT cloud, Heroku, RelateIQ, have shown that the workloads Salesforce customers need can be reliably delivered by Amazon at an ever decreasing unit cost,” Wang explained.

Al Hilwa, an analyst with IDC who covers enterprise cloud, says we shouldn’t read too much into this and it could be purely about negotiating a better price.

“What we are likely seeing here is some new negotiated terms and pricing between the two firms.  A number of Salesforce apps can and will run on AWS,” Hilwa told TechCrunch.

AWS announced that the deal includes Sales Cloud, Service Cloud, App Cloud, Community Cloud, Analytics Cloud and more.

We are seeing increasing partnering among the big enterprise companies as each tries to walk the line between competing and cooperating. Just last week SAP announced a deeper cloud deal with Microsoft. As Nadella has said, no platform can stand alone anymore because customers are demanding interoperability.

This latest deal is just another case of Salesforce covering its bases and providing a cost-effective way to expand its markets overseas without getting so chummy with Microsoft that it becomes overly reliant on them.

Posted Under: Tech News
Salesforce brings cross-channel service a step closer with new ‘Snap-ins’

Posted by on 25 May, 2016

This post was originally published on this site

You can’t always bring customers to your best customer-service tools, but now you can bring those tools to them thanks to a new addition announced Wednesday for Salesforce’s Service Cloud.

Dubbed Service Cloud Lightning Snap-ins, the new offering allows organizations of any size to take key support features from Salesforce’s Service Cloud and “drop” them into their websites or mobile apps. Case-management and live-chat capabilities can now be added to mobile and Web apps, for example, and a tap-to-call feature is available for Android and iOS.

A new module enabling two-way video chat, meanwhile, allows customers and agents to see each other. A customer could also use a smartphone’s front-facing camera to show the agent the problem at hand.

“Customers today expect service that is smart, personalized and fast — wherever and whenever they are interacting with a brand,” said Mike Milburn, general manager and senior vice president for Service Cloud.

Sixty-one percent of consumers use multiple channels to resolve customer-service issues, so it’s essential for companies to connect with them across channels, Salesforce said.

Service Cloud Lightning targets customer-service departments, and the Snap-ins are designed to make their service more personalized via SDKs (software development kits) for Web and mobile. The idea is that agents can use contextual customer details from app data to point customers to the right solutions quickly.

Last year, Salesforce launched Service for Apps to help companies integrate Service Cloud into mobile apps. Now, it’s extending that in-app service to websites and Web apps and simplifying the process through the new SDKs.

Service Cloud Lightning is available in editions starting at $75 per user per month; most Snap-in functions are priced separately. Snap-in SDKs are expected to be generally available next month and will be included for users with a Service Cloud Lightning enterprise or unlimited license at no additional cost.

Posted Under: Cloud Computing
Salesforce brings cross-channel service a step closer with new ‘Snap-ins’

Posted by on 25 May, 2016

This post was originally published on this site

You can’t always bring customers to your best customer-service tools, but now you can bring those tools to them thanks to a new addition announced Wednesday for Salesforce’s Service Cloud.

Dubbed Service Cloud Lightning Snap-ins, the new offering allows organizations of any size to take key support features from Salesforce’s Service Cloud and “drop” them into their websites or mobile apps. Case-management and live-chat capabilities can now be added to mobile and Web apps, for example, and a tap-to-call feature is available for Android and iOS.

A new module enabling two-way video chat, meanwhile, allows customers and agents to see each other. A customer could also use a smartphone’s front-facing camera to show the agent the problem at hand.

“Customers today expect service that is smart, personalized and fast — wherever and whenever they are interacting with a brand,” said Mike Milburn, general manager and senior vice president for Service Cloud.

Sixty-one percent of consumers use multiple channels to resolve customer-service issues, so it’s essential for companies to connect with them across channels, Salesforce said.

Service Cloud Lightning targets customer-service departments, and the Snap-ins are designed to make their service more personalized via SDKs (software development kits) for Web and mobile. The idea is that agents can use contextual customer details from app data to point customers to the right solutions quickly.

Last year, Salesforce launched Service for Apps to help companies integrate Service Cloud into mobile apps. Now, it’s extending that in-app service to websites and Web apps and simplifying the process through the new SDKs.

Service Cloud Lightning is available in editions starting at $75 per user per month; most Snap-in functions are priced separately. Snap-in SDKs are expected to be generally available next month and will be included for users with a Service Cloud Lightning enterprise or unlimited license at no additional cost.

Posted Under: General
Preparing for infrastructures of the future

Posted by on 25 May, 2016

This post was originally published on this site

There are many abstract notions about what the future of infrastructure will look like, but the truth is that the future is staring companies in the face. The adoption of hybrid cloud models, containers and microservices architectures are only the beginning stages of preparing for infrastructures of the future.

The largest enterprises have already experienced the volume of data that all companies will soon be ingesting. And they have evolved to meet the demands of these changing needs. As more organizations begin to realize the power of big data, they can learn valuable lessons from the evolution of global giants like Google, Facebook and Apple.

Google started with the premise that computer science, at scale, makes the intractable tractable. Underlying Google’s scale-supporting infrastructure are warehouse-sized data centers with exabytes of storage and terabit networks.

In recent years, a shift has occurred rendering this infrastructure critical not only for consumer web applications, but also for enterprise class problems, like big data processing, agility needs, 24/7 availability, faster delivery, customer engagement through social mechanisms, real-time communications and so on. And we are on the cusp of new technologies that will require even more infrastructure resources, like IoT and virtual reality.

Understanding the problem of scale

Companies approach scaled-out systems from several perspectives. Opportunity is often the primary one; harnessing your data gives a company commercial advantage. Cost is another. If your system is designed only to scale up, then you are locked into a certain price point driven by hardware resources being used. Elasticity is a third, for cases when workloads are irregular, prone to peaks or for the cases where you see hockey-stick growth.

While it is sometimes easiest to think my needs are all of the above, it is important to prioritize and stay focused. For example, at Google’s scale, elasticity was the most critical criterion. When Google launched “autocomplete,” the feature that guesses an individual’s search as it’s typed, the queries on the backend increased tenfold. Without elasticity already built in, this type of project could have taken years rather than months to deploy into production.

Addressing the problem with modern tools

Google has famously said everything inside the company runs on containers. In that sense, anyone in the process of “googling” something is involved in a container project. Containers by nature have lower runtime requirements for applications, which reduces their size and allows them to be deployed quickly, making them a better fit for the new stack.

Google uses an internal cluster operating system, Borg (a reference to the decidedly unfriendly species in Star Trek: The Next Generation), that was built to manage both long-running services and batch jobs, which had previously been handled by two separate systems: Babysitter and the Global Work Queue. These predecessors, which were from the early days of Google, strongly influenced Borg and predated Linux control groups.

We are on the cusp of new technologies that will require even more infrastructure resources.

Borg shares machines between these two types of applications — filling the troughs of long-running services such as YouTube uploads with batch jobs such as logs processing — as a way of increasing resource utilization and thereby reducing costs. Such sharing was possible because container support in the Linux kernel became available, enabling better isolation between latency-sensitive user-facing services and CPU-hungry batch processes.

As more and more applications were developed to run on top of Borg, Google’s application and infrastructure teams developed tools and services for it. These systems provided mechanisms for configuring and updating jobs; predicting resource requirements; dynamically pushing configuration files to running jobs; service discovery and load balancing; auto-scaling; machine-lifecycle management; quota management and much more.

Similarly, today’s developers build management APIs around containers rather than machines, shifting the data centers’ focus from machine to application. This frees application developers and ops teams from worrying about specific details of machines and operating systems. It ties telemetry collected by the management system to applications rather than machines, which dramatically improves application monitoring and introspection, especially when scale-up, machine failures or maintenance issues cause application instances to move.

The future

The future is near. Sensor-generated data, such IoT data, will soon swamp other kinds of data. The need to process this collected data in real-time — not only for self-driving cars but for all kinds of retail, industrial, gamification or consumer homes — will spur a need for new degrees of agility. The runtime environment will be more hybrid: AWS, Google Cloud, Azure will be more balanced in terms of market share and will be joined by other large private clouds, such as industrial automation clouds and consumer-home clouds.

Featured Image: David Merrett/Flickr UNDER A CC BY 2.0 LICENSE

Posted Under: Tech News
Ansible 2.1 gets a grip on Microsoft Azure and Docker

Posted by on 25 May, 2016

This post was originally published on this site

When popular IT automation framework Ansible was acquired by Red Hat, the question had to be asked: What’s going to change? Would Ansible be geared to support Red Hat’s products?

It didn’t seem that way with Ansible 2.0 when it debuted back in January with a host of generic improvements to its scripting handling. Version 2.1, though, brings broader support for containers, Microsoft Windows, and Microsoft Azure, technologies Red Hat has either invested itself in heavily or partnered with. But the changes remain high-level, not coupled to anything Red Hat does.

The Azure-specific additions include support for Azure Resource Manager, which uses templates and RBACs to consistently and repeatably deploy resources for applications. It’s the kind of work Ansible itself might do, so having Ansible leverage Azure’s methods makes plenty of sense.

With Windows generally, Ansible can now manage other parts of the OS, such as Windows file sharing and the firewall, and it can use NTLM directly, instead of Kerberos, to manage machines joined to a domain. A new action, win_reboot, makes it easier to script workflows that require restarting a system, which is hard to avoid if you’re performing multiple software or kernel-driver installations.

Ansible 2.1 also overhauls container support — another field where Red Hat has been heavily involved. The existing Docker modules have been rewritten, and a new docker_service module allows Docker Compose to be embedded into Ansible playbooks. This means Ansible now has more control over the deployment infrastructrure used to run containers, as well as the ability to interface closely with how containers are built and managed.

A third major addition to Ansible 2.1 is networking automation for using Ansible to control networking platforms like Cisco, Juniper, Cumulus, Arista, and OpenSwitch.

So far, Red Hat has provided Ansible with features that are at least a partial reflection of Red Hat’s own interests, but on a high level — such as support for containers generally, rather than OpenShift or RHEL specifically. That’s a good direction to take, as it does justice to existing Ansible users and their use cases, rather than putting the brunt of new and future Ansible features into supporting Red Hat infrastructure. Let’s hope it stays that way.

Posted Under: Database, General, Networking, Security, Tech News
Google’s Abacus API adds security by subtracting passwords

Posted by on 25 May, 2016

This post was originally published on this site

Users are notoriously bad at creating strong passwords, so Google’s Project Abacus proposes shifting the authentication burden away from users and onto their Android devices.

This isn’t merely a pie-in-the-sky infosec team notion, either, as the company plans to make the technology available to all Android developers before the end of the year.

Abacus runs in the background and monitors the user’s activity on the device, such as search content, current location, and typing patterns. These elements are combined with biometric data, such as facial recognition, voice speed, and fingerprints, to derive a cumulative Trust Score to unlock devices or sign into applications.

The plan is to make authentication even simpler and more efficient than existing multifactor authentication schemes because the user doesn’t have to do anything differently or learn to use something new.

Many authentication technologies already rely on the user having the device with them. Abacus extends the idea so that the user doesn’t have to prove identity. Instead, the smartphone knows the user and knows whether or not that user has access to the specific application.

Abacus has been in the works for the past year and is currently in trials at 33 universities. Google plans to release the API for Abacus to select financial institutions in June and make it available to all Android developers by the end of 2016, Dan Kaufman, the lead of Google’s Advanced Technologies and Projects division, said in a talk at Google I/O last week.

Many information security folks would love to see passwords disappear, and biometrics is the most popular approach at the moment. Just as the fingerprint lock on the iPhone and Android devices has made PIN codes/pattern locks/passphrases unnecessary, developers see the potential of using facial recognition and speech patterns to authenticate users trying to access their applications. Google already offers several different schemes, including sending one-time codes to mobile phones whenever a user tries to log in from an unknown device and unlocking the device through facial recognition.

There are some concerns about overly relying on biometrics, such as situations where the user has an injury and can’t easily swipe the fingerprint sensor, or has a bad enough cold that the voice recognition fails. Abacus doesn’t rely on biometrics only to calculate the Trust Score, and more importantl the Trust Score merely indicates how confident the system is that the user is who the user claims to be. The decision on whether or not to grant access stays with the developer.

In practice, developers can set a certain threshold for the application. If the user’s Trust Score is not high enough (maybe the user has that aforementioned cold), then the application can fall back to asking the user to enter a password or try another method of verification. Some developers may decide to require a lower score for their application than others.

The fact that the system monitors what we do or what we type while surfing online seems a little creepy, and when paired with Google’s insatiable appetite for all kinds of user data, the endeavor feels overly intrusive. The question is how much of the information is actually stored and whether the company plans to mine Abacus data for its other analytics projects. If typing patterns and search terms aren’t actually stored but used as part of calculations, for example, then the monitoring doesn’t feel so much like surveillance.

Trust Score may gain traction precisely because it seems to make authentication less intrusive. Users don’t enable two-factor authentication for myriad reasons, including the fact that it slows down the log in process, it’s awkward, or they don’t want to share their mobile phone numbers. The question is whether users would trust their smartphones to know who they are. Considering how much of their lives users already have on their smartphones, it’s not so far-fetched that they would be willing to give their devices that much authority.

Posted Under: Security
Google’s Abacus API adds security by subtracting passwords

Posted by on 25 May, 2016

This post was originally published on this site

Users are notoriously bad at creating strong passwords, so Google’s Project Abacus proposes shifting the authentication burden away from users and onto their Android devices.

This isn’t merely a pie-in-the-sky infosec team notion, either, as the company plans to make the technology available to all Android developers before the end of the year.

Abacus runs in the background and monitors the user’s activity on the device, such as search content, current location, and typing patterns. These elements are combined with biometric data, such as facial recognition, voice speed, and fingerprints, to derive a cumulative Trust Score to unlock devices or sign into applications.

The plan is to make authentication even simpler and more efficient than existing multifactor authentication schemes because the user doesn’t have to do anything differently or learn to use something new.

Many authentication technologies already rely on the user having the device with them. Abacus extends the idea so that the user doesn’t have to prove identity. Instead, the smartphone knows the user and knows whether or not that user has access to the specific application.

Abacus has been in the works for the past year and is currently in trials at 33 universities. Google plans to release the API for Abacus to select financial institutions in June and make it available to all Android developers by the end of 2016, Dan Kaufman, the lead of Google’s Advanced Technologies and Projects division, said in a talk at Google I/O last week.

Many information security folks would love to see passwords disappear, and biometrics is the most popular approach at the moment. Just as the fingerprint lock on the iPhone and Android devices has made PIN codes/pattern locks/passphrases unnecessary, developers see the potential of using facial recognition and speech patterns to authenticate users trying to access their applications. Google already offers several different schemes, including sending one-time codes to mobile phones whenever a user tries to log in from an unknown device and unlocking the device through facial recognition.

There are some concerns about overly relying on biometrics, such as situations where the user has an injury and can’t easily swipe the fingerprint sensor, or has a bad enough cold that the voice recognition fails. Abacus doesn’t rely on biometrics only to calculate the Trust Score, and more importantl the Trust Score merely indicates how confident the system is that the user is who the user claims to be. The decision on whether or not to grant access stays with the developer.

In practice, developers can set a certain threshold for the application. If the user’s Trust Score is not high enough (maybe the user has that aforementioned cold), then the application can fall back to asking the user to enter a password or try another method of verification. Some developers may decide to require a lower score for their application than others.

The fact that the system monitors what we do or what we type while surfing online seems a little creepy, and when paired with Google’s insatiable appetite for all kinds of user data, the endeavor feels overly intrusive. The question is how much of the information is actually stored and whether the company plans to mine Abacus data for its other analytics projects. If typing patterns and search terms aren’t actually stored but used as part of calculations, for example, then the monitoring doesn’t feel so much like surveillance.

Trust Score may gain traction precisely because it seems to make authentication less intrusive. Users don’t enable two-factor authentication for myriad reasons, including the fact that it slows down the log in process, it’s awkward, or they don’t want to share their mobile phone numbers. The question is whether users would trust their smartphones to know who they are. Considering how much of their lives users already have on their smartphones, it’s not so far-fetched that they would be willing to give their devices that much authority.

Posted Under: Database, General, Networking, Security, Tech News
55% off Rugged Geek Portable Power Supply and Vehicle Jump Starter – Deal Alert

Posted by on 25 May, 2016

This post was originally published on this site

Here we have a good candidate for this year’s Father’s Day gift, either for yourself or a dad you know. This handy gadget is a 600A portable power supply capable of charging your laptops, tablets and phones. However, this one can also boost most cars, trucks, SUVs, motorcycles and tractors as well. The Rugged Geek INTELLIBOOST is truly designed for all of the critical batteries in your life. In an emergency, just connect the included jumper cables and attach to your vehicle’s dead battery. It will start gas engines up to 6.0l and diesel engines up to 3.0l. It also features 2 USB Charging ports to charge your devices, a laptop charging port with 8 included laptop tips, and a powerful LED flashlight with emergency modes. All while maintaining a footprint similar in size to most smartphones, and a weight of under 1 pound. It currently averages 4.5 out of 5 stars on Amazon from over 140 reviewers, many of which have posted videos of themselves successfully boosting their own vehicles including a 6.0l Cadillac (see reviews). With a regular price of $199.99, this 55% off deal puts it at just $89.99. Jump over to Amazon for more information and to explore buying options.

This story, “55% off Rugged Geek Portable Power Supply and Vehicle Jump Starter – Deal Alert” was originally published by TechConnect.

Posted Under: Mobile
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