Category Archives: Database

Best of NoSQL: 7 document databases compared

Posted by on 21 June, 2017

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“The right tool for the right job.” If such wisdom holds true anywhere, it certainly holds true with the choice of database a developer picks for a given application. Document databases, one of the family of data products collectively referred to as “NoSQL,” are for developers who want to focus on their application rather than the database technology.

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(Insider Story)

How Cosmos DB ensures data consistency in the global cloud

Posted by on 30 May, 2017

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Cloud computing isn’t like working on-premises. Instead of limiting code to one or maybe two datacenters, we’re designing systems that span not just continents but the entire world.

And that’s where we start to get issues. Even using fiber connections, the latency of crossing the Atlantic Ocean is around 60ms, though in practice delays are around 75ms. The Pacific is wider, so latency through trans-Pacific fiber is around 100ms.

Delays add up, and they make it hard to ensure that distributed databases are in sync. That makes it harder still to be sure that a query in the U.K. will return the same result as one in the U.S. Yes, most replication strategies mean that eventually the two will have the same content, but there’s a big question over just when that will happen. If the connections are busy, or there a lot of database writes, data can easily get delayed.

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Does Microsoft’s Cosmos DB promise too much?

Posted by on 23 May, 2017

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Microsoft apparently missed database godfather Michael Stonebraker’s memo. In 2005 Stonebraker declared the “one size fits all” mentality of the database market is an idea whose “time has come and gone.” Fast forward to 2017 and Microsoft launched Azure Cosmos DB, a new database that promises to do… everything.

No, really. Everything.

Relational data? Check. Documents? Yep. Graph? Of course. Strong consistency? Bingo! Eventual consistency? That, too! In fact, Cosmos DB has five consistency models to choose from.

Not surprisingly, euphoric cries greeted the press release, with one developer gushing that it “absolutely beats any competitor in the cloud” and, as such, “not sure why would you go for anything else today.” Microsoft, even less surprisingly, agreed, calling Azure Cosmos DB “the first globally-distributed data service that lets you elastically scale throughput and storage across any number of geographical regions while guaranteeing low latency, high availability, and [five well-defined] consistency [models].”

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CrateDB 2.0 Enterprise stresses security and monitoring—and open source

Posted by on 16 May, 2017

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When open source SQL database CrateDB first debuted, its professed mission was to deliver easy, fast analytics on reams of machine-generated data, while running in containerized, cloud-native environments.

That mission hasn’t changed with the release of version 2.0, but it has been expanded by way of an enterprise edition with pro-level features. Rather than distribute the enterprise edition as a closed-source, binary blob, the maker of CrateDB is offering it as open source to help speed uptake and participation.

SQL, not slow-QL

CrateDB is designed to ingest high-volume, machine-generated data, whether logs from a fleet of servers or sensor data from IoT devices, and make that data accessible through traditional SQL queries. The data may be structured or unstructured; it can be a conventional table, or a freeform JSON document.

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Q&A: Microsoft Cosmos DB creator lays out vision for planet-scale database

Posted by on 12 May, 2017

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Microsoft has fired a shot heard around the globe, so to speak, in data management with the debut of Azure Cosmos DB at the recent Microsoft Build 2017 developer conference in Seattle. The cloud database is positioned for elasticity and globally available data, supported on the Azure cloud. The project was founded in 2010 by Microsoft’s Dharma Shukla, who holds the title of distinguished engineer at the company.

InfoWorld Editor at Large Paul Krill spoke with Shukla during the conference to get his perspectives on the technology.

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Why Microsoft’s Cosmos DB represents the future of cloud databases

Posted by on 11 May, 2017

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At first glance, Microsoft’s new Cosmos DB Azure database seems like a rebadged successor to Azure’s planet-scale NoSQL offering, DocumentDB. It’s easy to read Cosmos DB as a point-revision version of its predecessor, down to the fact that existing DocumentDB users will be automigrated.

But what’s most important about Cosmos DB is not where it’s coming from, but where it’s heading—and how it may be taking a sizable slice of the cloud-native database world with it. Here are four reasons why Cosmos DB is a harbinger of what’s to come for cloud-native database technology and how it’s a sign of what’s already arrived.

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Open source SQL database CockroachDB hits 1.0

Posted by on 10 May, 2017

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CockroachDB, an open source, fault-tolerant SQL database with horizontal scaling and strong consistency across nodes—and a name few people will likely forget—is now officially available.

Cockroach Labs, the company behind its development, touts CockroachDB as a “cloud native” database solution—a system engineered to run as a distributed resource. Version 1.0 is available in both basic and for-pay editions, and both boast features that will appeal to enterprises.

The company is rolling the dice with its handling of the enterprise edition by also making those components open source and trusting that enterprises will pay for what they use in production.

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NoSQL, no problem: Why MySQL is still king

Posted by on 10 May, 2017

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MySQL is a bit of an attention hog. With relational databases supposedly put on deathwatch by NoSQL, MySQL should have been edging gracefully to the exit by now (or not so gracefully, like IBM’s DB2).

Instead, MySQL remains neck-and-neck with Oracle in the database popularity contest, despite nearly two decades less time in the market. More impressive still, while Oracle’s popularity keeps falling, MySQL is holding steady. Why?

An open gift that keeps on giving

While both MySQL and Oracle lost favor relative to their database peers, as measured by DB-Engines, MySQL remains hugely popular, second only to Oracle (and not by much):

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MapD’s GPU-powered database is now open source

Posted by on 9 May, 2017

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MapD, creator of a GPU-accelerated database that scales both up and out, has open-sourced its core technology.

As announced in a press release and blog post, the core database and its “associated visualization libraries” are available under the Apache 2.0 license. But enterprise-level features like the high availability, LDAP, ODBC, and horizontal scaling functionality—many of which debuted in the 3.0 version released earlier this month—will be kept close to the chest.

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Google’s Cloud Spanner melds transactional consistency, NoSQL scale

Posted by on 4 May, 2017

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Earlier this year, Google offered a peek at Cloud Spanner, an automanaged database service that melds features from both conventional relational systems and NoSQL technologies.

Today, Google announced Cloud Spanner will be available to the general public later this month. It will compete not only with rival cloud databases, but also up-and-coming open source projects that address scale and reliability issues by using Google’s own ideas.

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